Last year, while living away from my family for a year to do ethnographic fieldwork in a remote village on a tiny Lesser Antillean island, I kept myself sane and connected to the political news in my home country by creating a new hobby. I applied my knowledge of inferential statistics and computational simulation to use fact checker reports from PolitiFact.com and The Fact Checker at the Washington Post to comparatively judge the truthfulness of the 2012 presidential and vice presidential candidates, and (more importantly) to measure our uncertainty in those judgments. 

The site (and its syndication on the Daily Kos) generated some good discussion, some respectable traffic, and (I hope) showed its followers the potential for a new kind of inference-driven fact checking journalism. My main conclusions from the 2012 election analysis were:

(1) The candidates aren't as different as partisans left or right would have us believe.

(2) But the Democratic ticket was somewhat more truthful than the Republican ticket, both overall, and during the debates.

(3) It's quite likely that the 2012 Republican ticket was less truthful than the 2008 Republican ticket, and somewhat likely that the 2012 Democratic ticket was less truthful than the 2008 Democratic ticket.

Throughout, I tempered these conclusions with the recognition that my analyses did not account for the possible biases of fact checkers, including biases toward fairness, newsworthiness, and, yes, political beliefs. Meanwhile, I discussed ways to work toward measuring these biases and adjusting measures of truthfulness for them. I also suggested that fact checkers should begin in earnest to acknowledge that they aren't just checking facts, but the logical validity of politicians' arguments, as well. That is, fact checkers should also become fallacy checkers who gauge the soundness of an argument, not simply the truth of its premises. 

Now, it's time to close up shop. Not because I don't plan on moving forward with what I'm proud to have done here. I'm closing up shop because I have much bigger ideas.

I've started writing up an master plan for a research institute and social media platform that will revolutionize fact checking journalism. For now, I'm calling the project Sound Check. I might have to change the name because that domain name is taken. Whatever its eventual name, Sound Check will be like FiveThirtyEight meets YouGov meets PolitiFact meets RapGenius: data-driven soundness checking journalism and research on an annotated social web. You can read more about the idea from this draft executive summary.

Anyway, over the next three years (and beyond!), I hope you're going to hear a lot about this project. Already, I've started searching for funding so that I can, once I obtain my PhD in June 2014, start working full time on Sound Check.

One plan is to become an "Upstart". Upstart is a new idea from some ex-Googlers. At Upstart, individual graduates hedge their personal risk by looking for investor/mentors, who gain returns from the Upstart's future income (which is predicted from a proprietary algorithm owned by Upstart). Think of it as a capitalist, mentoring-focused sort of patronage. Unlike Kickstarter or other crowd-funding mechanisms, where patrons get feel-good vibes and rewards, Upstart investors are investing in a person like they would invest in a company.

Another plan is, of course, to go the now almost traditional crowd-funding route, but only for clearly defined milestones of the project. For example, first I'd want to get funding to organize a meet-up of potential collaborators and investors. Next I'd want to get funding for the beta-testing of the sound checking algorithm. After that I'd get funding for a beta-test of the social network aspect of Sound Check. Perhaps the these (hopefully successfully) crowd-funded projects would create interest among heavy-hitting investors.

Yet another idea is to entice some university (UW?) and some wealthy person or group of people interested in civic engagement and political fact checking to partner with Sound Check in a way similar to how FactCheck.org grew out of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at University of Pennsylvania.

Sound Check is a highly ambitious idea. It will need startup funding for servers, programmers, administrative staff, as well as training and maintaining Sound Checkers (that's fact checkers who also fallacy check). So I've got my work cut out for me. I'm open to advice and new mentors. And soon, I'll be open, along with Sound Check, to investors and donors.
 
 

More things I've changed

  • I'm focusing on averaging bullpucky across fact checkers rather than individual bullpucky scores (because I only have so much time on my hands right now until I get some funding for this project).
  • I sample proportions in each category from a Dirichlet distribution instead of sampling numbers in each category from a multinomial distribution. We're trying to estimate the probability of making a given category of statement, not the number of statements in a given category.
  • When aggregating individuals, I will usually add up their report cards rather than average their individual bullpucky.


Check out the methods section for more details.

Things I need to do

  • Get this site finished and its content interesting enough to attract traffic and funding.
  • I want to make this thing a non-profit organization; so figure out how to do that legally.
  • I want to learn D3.js so I can build a better site and make better graphs and stuff.
 

    about

    Malark-O-blog published news and commentary about the statistical analysis of the comparative truthfulness of the 2012 presidential and vice presidential candidates. It has since closed down while its author makes bigger plans.

    author

    Brash Equilibrium is an evolutionary anthropologist and writer. His real name is Benjamin Chabot-Hanowell. His wife calls him Babe. His daughter calls him Papa.

    what is malarkey?

    It's a polite word for bullshit. Here, it's a measure of falsehood. 0 means you're truthful on average. 100 means you're 100% full of malarkey. Details.

    what is simulated malarkey?

    Fact checkers only rate a small sample of the statements that politicians make. How uncertain are we about the real truthfulness of politicians? To find out, treat fact checker report cards like an experiment, and use random number generators to repeat that experiment a lot of times to see all the possible outcomes. Details.

    malark-O-glimpse

    Can you tell the difference between the 2012 presidential election tickets from just a glimpse at their simulated malarkey score distributions?

    Picture
    dark = pres, light = vp
    (Click for larger image.)

    fuzzy portraits of malarkey

    Simulated distributions of malarkey for each 2012 presidential candidate with 95% confidence interval on either side of the simulated average malarkey score. White line at half truthful. (Rounded to nearest whole number.)

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 87% certain Obama is less than half full of malarkey.
    • 100% certain Romney is more than half full of malarkey.
    • 66% certain Biden is more than half full of malarkey.
    • 70% certain Ryan is more than half full of malarkey.
    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    fuzzy portraits of ticket malarkey

    Simulated distributions of collated and average malarkey for each 2012 presidential election ticket, with 95% confidence interval labeled on either side of the simulated malarkey score. White line at half truthful. (Rounded to nearest whole number.)

    malarkometer fuzzy ticket portraits 2012-10-16 2012 election
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 81% certain Obama/Biden's collective statements are less than half full of malarkey.
    • 100% certain Romney/Ryan's collective statements are more than half full of malarkey.
    • 51% certain the Democratic candidates are less than half full of malarkey.
    • 97% certain the Republican candidates are on average more than half full of malarkey.
    • 95% certain the candidates' statements are on average more than half full of malarkey.
    • 93% certain the candidates themselves are on average more than half full of malarkey.
    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    Comparisons

    Simulated probability distributions of the difference the malarkey scores of one 2012 presidential candidate or party and another, with 95% confidence interval labeled on either side of simulated mean malarkey. Blue bars are when Democrats spew more malarkey, red when Republicans do. White line and purple bar at equal malarkey. (Rounded to nearest hundredth.)

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 100% certain Romney spews more malarkey than Obama.
    • 55% certain Ryan spews more malarkey than Biden.
    • 100% certain Romney/Ryan collectively spew more malarkey than Obama/Biden.
    • 94% certain the Republican candidates spew more malarkey on average than the Democratic candidates.
    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    2012 prez debates

    presidential debates

    Simulated probability distribution of the malarkey spewed by individual 2012 presidential candidates during debates, with 95% confidence interval labeled on either side of simulated mean malarkey. White line at half truthful. (Rounded to nearest whole number.)

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 66% certain Obama was more than half full of malarkey during the 1st debate.
    • 81% certain Obama was less than half full of malarkey during the 2nd debate.
    • 60% certain Obama was less than half full of malarkey during the 3rd debate.
    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 78% certain Romney was more than half full of malarkey during the 1st debate.
    • 80% certain Romney was less than half full of malarkey during the 2nd debate.
    • 66% certain Romney was more than half full of malarkey during the 3rd debate.
    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    aggregate 2012 prez debate

    Distributions of malarkey for collated 2012 presidential debate report cards and the average presidential debate malarkey score.
    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 68% certain Obama's collective debate statements were less than half full of malarkey.
    • 68% certain Obama was less than half full of malarkey during the average debate.
    • 67% certain Romney's collective debate statements were more than half full of malarkey.
    • 57% certain Romney was more than half full of malarkey during the average debate.
     (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    2012 vice presidential debate

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 60% certain Biden was less than half full of malarkey during the vice presidential debate.
    • 89% certain Ryan was more than half full of malarkey during the vice presidential debate.
    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    overall 2012 debate performance

    Malarkey score from collated report card comprising all debates, and malarkey score averaged over candidates on each party's ticket.
    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 72% certain Obama/Biden's collective statements during the debates were less than half full of malarkey.
    • 67% certain the average Democratic ticket member was less than half full of malarkey during the debates.
    • 87% certain Romney/Ryan's collective statements during the debates were more than half full of malarkey.
    • 88% certain the average Republican ticket member was more than half full of malarkey during the debates.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    2012 debate self comparisons

    Simulated probability distributions of the difference in malarkey that a 2012 presidential candidate spews normally compared to how much they spewed during a debate (or aggregate debate), with 95% confidence interval labeled on either side of the simulated mean difference. Light bars mean less malarkey was spewed during the debate than usual. Dark bars less. White bar at equal malarkey. (Rounded to nearest hundredth.)

    individual 2012 presidential debates

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 80% certain Obama spewed more malarkey during the 1st debate than he usually does.
    • 84% certain Obama spewed less malarkey during the 2nd debate than he usually does.
    • 52% certain Obama spewed more malarkey during the 3rd debate than he usually does.
    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 51% certain Romney spewed more malarkey during the 1st debate than he usually does.
    • 98% certain Romney spewed less malarkey during the 2nd debate than he usually does.
    • 68% certain Romney spewed less malarkey during the 3rd debate than he usually does.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    aggregate 2012 presidential debate

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 58% certain Obama's statements during the debates were more full of malarkey than they usually are.
    • 56% certain Obama spewed more malarkey than he usually does during the average debate.
    • 73% certain Romney's statements during the debates were less full of malarkey than they usually are.
    • 86% certain Romney spewed less malarkey than he usually does during the average debate.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    vice presidential debate

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 70% certain Biden spewed less malarkey during the vice presidential debate than he usually does.
    • 86% certain Ryan spewed more malarkey during the vice presdiential debate than he usually does.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    2012 opponent comparisons

    Simulated probability distributions of the difference in malarkey between the Republican candidate and the Democratic candidate during a debate, with 95% confidence interval labeled on either side of simulated mean comparison. Blue bars are when Democrats spew more malarkey, red when Republicans do. White bar at equal malarkey. (Rounded to nearest hundredth.)

    individual 2012 presidential debates

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 60% certain Romney spewed more malarkey during the 1st debate than Obama.
    • 49% certain Romney spewed more malarkey during the 2nd debate than Obama.
    • 72% certain Romney spewed more malarkey during the 3rd debate than Obama.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    aggregate 2012 presidential debate

    Picture
    (Click for larger image.)
    • 74% certain Romney's statements during the debates were more full of malarkey than Obama's.
    • 67% certain Romney was more full of malarkey than Obama during the average debate.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    vice presidential debate

    • 92% certain Ryan spewed more malarkey than Biden during the vice presidential debate.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    overall 2012 debate comparison

    Party comparison of 2012 presidential ticket members' collective and individual average malarkey scores during debates.
    • 88% certain that Republican ticket members' collective statements were more full of malarkey than Democratic ticket members'.
    • 86% certain that the average Republican candidate spewed more malarkey during the average debate than the average Democratic candidate.

    (Probabilities rounded to nearest percent.)

    observe & report

    Below are the observed malarkey scores and comparisons form the  malarkey scores of the 2012 presidential candidates.

    2012 prez candidates

    Truth-O-Meter only (observed)

    candidate malarkey
    Obama 44
    Biden 48
    Romney 55
    Ryan 58

    The Fact Checker only (observed)

    candidate malarkey
    Obama 53
    Biden 58
    Romney 60
    Ryan 47

    Averaged over fact checkers

    candidate malarkey
    Obama 48
    Biden 53
    Romney 58
    Ryan 52

    2012 Red prez vs. Blue prez

    Collated bullpucky

    ticket malarkey
    Obama/Biden 46
    Romney/Ryan 56

    Average bullpucky

    ticket malarkey
    Obama/Biden 48
    Romney/Ryan 58

    2012 prez debates

    1st presidential debate

    opponent malarkey
    Romney 61
    Obama 56

    2nd presidential debate (town hall)

    opponent malarkey
    Romney 31
    Obama 33

    3rd presidential debate

    opponent malarkey
    Romney 57
    Obama 46

    collated presidential debates

    opponent malarkey
    Romney 54
    Obama 46

    average presidential debate

    opponent malarkey
    Romney 61
    Obama 56

    vice presidential debate

    opponent malarkey
    Ryan 68
    Biden 44

    collated debates overall

    ticket malarkey
    Romney/Ryan 57
    Obama/Biden 46

    average debate overall

    ticket malarkey
    Romney/Ryan 61
    Obama/Biden 56

    the raw deal

    You've come this far. Why not just check out the raw data Maslark-O-Meter is using? I promise you: it is as riveting as a phone book.

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